Tuesday, February 5, 2013

NYPD and FDNY Rescue Worker Injured On Top Of Roosevelt Island Tram Cabin This Afternoon

Tram Rescue Image From Eric Mellinger

According to this Roosevelt Island Operating Corp (RIOC) advisory sent out at 12: 24 PM:
Please be advised that due to FDNY and NYPD activity, Tram service has been temporarily suspended. We will immediately send out a notice when service resumes.

Images Of NYPD And FDNY Rescue Units At Roosevelt Island Tram

A little bit after 12 PM today, I started receiving phone calls and messages asking what was going on at the Roosevelt Island Tram with some readers reporting:
SIX PSD cars and ONE FDNY ambulance at Tram
and:
UPDATE: THREE FDNY Trucks, SIX PSD cars and ONE FDNY ambulance at Tram
and:
the tram is stuck with people on it and the island is flooded with fire and police vehicles.
Image From Paul Callendrillo

Image From Eric Mellinger


I arrived at the scene and tweeted:
 Image of Tram Rescue

It turns out that a tram worker got his foot stuck on top of the Tram Cabin. He was rescued by NYPD and FDNY.

Tram Rescue Image From Eric Mellinger

Extent of injuries not known at this time.

Tram service was back to normal at about 1:45 PM.

UPDATE 9:45 PM - According to MYFoxNY:
An iron worker was doing routine maintenance on the Roosevelt Island Tram when his leg got stuck above some machinery in Tower 3, nearly 250 feet in the air, at around 12:30 p.m. Tuesday....

... The workers right leg was badly damaged, but rescuers said that he was talking and awake through it all.

New York News | NYC Breaking News

3 comments:

Michael Moreo said...

Here we go again.... If the PSD Director wanted to be in charge of Emergency Management, then he should do his job. Funny how communication between agencies and the Tram Operators was smoother when some "Second Rate Volunteer Firefighter" was running Emergency Management for RIOC.

Janet Falk said...

Were there any passengers on the tram that was stuck on Tower 1?

Matthew Johnson said...

Volunteers and career firefighters do the exact same job, face the exact same dangers, hold the exact same responsibility, and are all firefighters.